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Services for People Experiencing Violence & Abuse

This website was developed in partnership between the Ministry of Justice and 211 Saskatchewan (a service of United Way), to provide information and resources for people experiencing violence, and those who support them. For additional help in connecting to services, call or text 2-1-1.

  • I am in crisis

    If you are in immediate danger, call 911

    If you are not in immediate danger but need support, click here

  • I have
    been sexually assaulted

    • I have been sexually assaulted

      The first thing you need to focus on is your immediate safety. Do what you need to do to make yourself safe. Go to the hospital, contact someone you trust, call a sexual assault crisis line or the police.

      To talk to someone right now, call one of the 24-hour sexual assault support lines below:

      • West Central Crisis and Family Support Centre – Victim Assistance & Support Team (Central Saskatchewan)

      • Northeast Crisis Line (North Saskatchewan)

      • Prince Albert Mobile Crisis Unit – Sexual Assault Line

      • Regina Sexual Assault Centre – Sexual Assault Line (Saskatchewan)

      • Saskatoon Interval House – Women’s Abuse Crisis Line (Saskatchewan)

      • Saskatoon Sexual Assault and Information Centre – Sexual Assault Crisis Line

      211 Saskatchewan
      For help in finding the right programs or services, call 2-1-1, text 2-1-1, or start an online chat to speak with a caring Service Navigator.

      • The 211 SK service is free, confidential, and available 24/7/365.
      • Over the phone, 211 SK is available in 175+ languages.

      Go to a hospital if you have physical injuries that need to be looked after.

      If there has been vaginal intercourse, you need to consider the possibility of pregnancy (if that is a risk for you). You can get the emergency contraceptive pill to reduce the possibility of pregnancy. It must be taken within 5 days of being sexually assaulted. You can get this at a Planned Parenthood location, a doctor’s office, walk-in clinic, or at some hospitals.

      Another concern may be the possibility of getting a sexually transmitted infection. Some medication can be taken immediately after an assault to prevent certain infections.

      • You may choose treatment for possible exposure to Hepatitis B (if you have not had the vaccine before), which is offered at the hospital and needs to be done preferably within 48 hours of the assault.
      • Treatment is available for possible exposure to HIV, but it needs to be taken within hours of the assault and is still somewhat controversial. Talk with a medical professional for further information.
      • You may choose to have an HIV test at some point. The waiting period is usually 14 weeks before a test can be done, however there are times when it can be done earlier if it is a concern for you. Click here for a listing of sites that can do this testing anonymously. You can also call, text 2-1-1, or start an online chat to speak with a caring service navigator to find testing sites near you.

      Your emotional health also needs to be a concern. Experiencing sexual assault is very traumatizing, so consider seeking counselling from a sexual assault crisis line or agency for long-term healing and emotional well-being.

      You can use the search tool below to find support services in your area.
      211 program search select one/some/all

      Enter your location to get a better result (required)

      Visit PLEA (Public Legal Education Association of Saskatchewan) to view information on the rights of victims, medical testing, the legal system, and more.

  • I am experiencing abuse or violence

    • I am experiencing abuse or violence

      To talk to someone right now, call one of the 24-hour support lines below:

      Domestic Violence
      • West Central Crisis and Family Support Centre – Victim Assistance & Support Team (Central Saskatchewan)

      • Lloydminster Interval Home – Domestic Violence/Abuse Crisis Line

      • Northeast Crisis Line (North Saskatchewan)

      • Piwapan Women’s Centre – Crisis Line (North Saskatchewan)

      • Regina Transition House – Domestic Violence/Abuse Crisis Line

      • Saskatoon Interval House – Women’s Abuse Crisis Line (Saskatchewan)

      • Shelwin House – Domestic Violence Crisis Line (Yorkton)

      • Moose Jaw Transition House – Domestic Violence Crisis Line (South Saskatchewan)

      • Southwest Crisis Services – Safe Shelter

      Sexual Assault
      • West Central Crisis and Family Support Centre – Victim Assistance & Support Team (Central Saskatchewan)

      • Northeast Crisis Line (North Saskatchewan)

      • Prince Albert Mobile Crisis Unit – Sexual Assault Line

      • Regina Sexual Assault Centre – Sexual Assault Line (Saskatchewan)

      • Saskatoon Interval House – Women’s Abuse Crisis Line (Saskatchewan)

      • Saskatoon Sexual Assault and Information Centre – Sexual Assault Crisis Line

      211 Saskatchewan
      For help in finding the right programs or services, call 2-1-1, text 2-1-1, or start an online chat to speak with a caring Service Navigator.

      • The 211 SK service is free, confidential, and available 24/7/365.
      • Over the phone, 211 SK is available in 175+ languages.
      To find programs and services near you, use the search tool below:
      211 program search select one/some/all

      Enter your location to get a better result (required)
    • Legal Help

      Victims of abuse and crime have special protections to help address the matter, explore their legal remedies, and connect with available support. There are additional considerations and safeguards for victims of sexual violence. Click here for information.

  • I need to plan
    to escape from a violent situation

    • Safety Considerations

      It is important to understand that leaving an abusive relationship can be dangerous.

      • As you are seeking to regain some control over your life, learn about ways to stay safe and get help.
      • It is important to develop a safety plan and strategies to increase your safety.
      • Without help, the abuse is not likely to stop. There are many alternatives to consider. Assistance is available. Do not put yourself at risk.
      • Visit PLEA (Public Legal Education Association of Saskatchewan) for strategies and things to consider.

    • What is a safety plan? How do I make one?

      Safety planning is one way to reduce harm that may occur when leaving an abusive relationship.

      Making a safety plan will help you to avoid dangerous situations and to know the best way to react when you are in danger. When your safety plan is complete, you should have:

      • A list of important contacts
      • A way to get in touch with emergency and support services
      • Knowledge on how to avoid or reduce the risk of injury during a physical attack
      • Information about home security, and how to be safe in and outside your home
      • A safe place to go in an emergency, and a plan to get there (with your children)
      • Quick access to cash, important documents and basic necessities.

      Click the options below to access and complete a safety plan:

    • What can I expect if I go to a shelter?

      A women’s shelter (often called a transition house, interval house, safe house, or domestic violence shelter) is a safe place to stay while you work through future plans—and a place to turn to by phone if you need someone to talk to about the abuse you’ve experienced.

      If you are a woman who needs to get away from an abusive situation, then you are eligible to stay, with or without children, without charge.

      When you call, the staff member you talk to will ask some questions about your situation and will tell you whether there is space available. If the shelter is currently full, she will suggest other options for you.

      What to expect in shelter:

      • A secure facility
      • Private bedrooms for single women or families
      • Shared kitchen and living rooms
      • 24 hour staff available to assist and support you
      • Optional group support activities
      • An atmosphere of respect.
      You can use the search tool below to find support shelters near you.
      211 program search select one/some/all

      Enter your location to get a better result (required)
    • What will happen to my pets if I go to a shelter?

      A limited number of pet safekeeping programs are available in Saskatchewan, including:

      • The Regina Humane Society Safe Places Program accepts family pets when a victim of domestic violence is leaving, or has already left the home to enter a shelter environment.
      • The Saskatoon SPCA Pet Safekeeping Program assists the victims of domestic violence with the short-term care of companion animals. Call 306-374-7387 for information.
      • New Hope Dog Rescue’s Animal Safekeeping (ASK) Program provides free care for pets owned by the victims of interpersonal violence. The foster homes have received specialized training to meet the needs of pets coming from homes where there has been violence or abuse.
      • Established by the Swift Current SPCA, the ASK (Animal Safekeeping) Program assists local victims of domestic violence and their pets. Service is available on a referral basis through Southwest Crisis Service. Call 306-778-3386 for information.
      • In the Melfort area, the North East SPCA works with North East Outreach and Support Services to care for pets owned by the victims of domestic violence. Call 306-752-7722 for information.

      Learn more about safety planning and animal safekeeping programs at violencelink.ca.

    • What can I do if I am experiencing abuse but do not want to leave my home?

      You can receive support over the phone – to talk to someone right now, call one of the 24-hour support lines below:

      • West Central Crisis and Family Support Centre – Victim Assistance & Support Team (Central Saskatchewan)

      • Lloydminster Interval Home – Domestic Violence/Abuse Crisis Line

      • Northeast Crisis Line (North Saskatchewan)

      • Piwapan Women’s Centre – Crisis Line (North Saskatchewan)

      • Regina Transition House – Domestic Violence/Abuse Crisis Line

      • Saskatoon Interval House – Women’s Abuse Crisis Line (Saskatchewan)

      • Shelwin House – Domestic Violence Crisis Line (Yorkton)

      • Moose Jaw Transition House – Domestic Violence Crisis Line (South Saskatchewan)

      • Southwest Crisis Services – Safe Shelter

      211 Saskatchewan
      For help in finding the right programs or services, call 2-1-1, text 2-1-1, or start an online chat to speak with a caring Service Navigator.

      • The 211 SK service is free, confidential, and available 24/7/365.
      • Over the phone, 211 SK is available in 175+ languages.

      There are a number of agencies that can offer you counselling and support services.

      Use the search tool below to find support services in your area.
      211 program search select one/some/all

      Enter your location to get a better result (required)

      There are also legal interventions that can help to keep you safe if you choose to stay in your own home. Saskatchewan has a law (The Victims of Interpersonal Violence Act) that provides additional ways to help fight violence in personal relationships. This law applies to:

      • people who live together or have lived together as a couple or a family
      • people who live together or have lived together in an intimate relationship
      • parents of a child regardless of whether they are married and/or have ever lived together
      • people in an ongoing caregiving relationship whether they have lived together or not.

      This law creates three ways to deal with interpersonal violence :

      1. Emergency Intervention Orders
        • In an emergency, victims of interpersonal violence can apply to a special Justice of the Peace for help at any time of the day or night. Police officers, mobile crisis workers and victim services coordinators can help victims do this. In an emergency the Justice of the Peace can make an order without waiting for the case to go to court and without the accused being notified of the hearing or being present. The Justice of the Peace must be satisfied that there has been interpersonal violence and that the matter cannot wait for a court hearing.
        • An emergency intervention order can include an order that:
          • the victim have exclusive occupation of the home
          • a police officer remove the accused from the home
          • a police officer supervise while the accused or the victim takes personal belongings from the home
          • the accused not contact the victim and other family members
          • the accused not be near specified places where the victim or the family regularly go, such as their school or workplace
          • After a Justice of the Peace grants an emergency intervention order, the accused must be given a copy of the order. The order does not take effect against that person until they receive a copy of the order.
      Mobile Crisis Workers
      • West Central Crisis and Family Support Centre (Central Saskatchewan)

        Monday – Friday 9:00 am – 12:00 pm, 1:00 – 5:00 pm

      • Piwapan Women’s Centre – Crisis Line (North Saskatchewan)

        24/7 Hours

      • Prince Albert Mobile Crisis Unit

        Monday – Friday 4:00 pm – 8:00 am
        Saturday – Sunday 24 hours

      • Regina Mobile Crisis Services – Mobile Crisis Hotline

        24/7 Hours

      • Saskatoon Mobile Crisis

        24/7 Hours

      • Southwest Crisis Services

        24/7 Hours

      1. Victim’s Assistance Orders
        • A victim’s assistance order is similar to an emergency intervention order, but is designed to be used in non-emergency situations. This type of application is made by the victim to a judge at the Court of Queen’s Bench. When making a victim’s assistance order a judge can include any of the orders that may be made under an emergency intervention order.
        • A victim’s assistance order can also include an order:
          • that the accused pay the victim compensation for things like medical or dental expenses, moving expenses or legal fees
          • that either party have temporary possession of things like a car, children’s clothing, identification, keys or passwords
          • preventing the accused from selling or damaging any property that the victim has an interest in
          • recommending that the accused receive counselling
          • that the accused post a bond to ensure that they comply with the terms of any order.
      2. Warrants Permitting Entry
        • A Justice of the Peace may grant a warrant to a police officer, or other designated person, to enter a place where there are reasonable grounds to believe a victim of interpersonal violence will be found. The warrant may be granted only after the potential abuser has refused access to helpers or to the police to check on a person who may be a victim of interpersonal violence. It gives the holder of the warrant the right to go into the home. They may assist or examine the possible victim and may remove the victim from the home, if necessary.
    • Interpersonal Violence Work Leave
      • Interpersonal Violence Leave is a job-protected leave of up to 10 days in a period of 52 weeks for survivors of interpersonal or sexual violence to access supports or relocate to a new home.
        • The 10 day leave can be taken as five employer paid days and five unpaid days.
        • The leave can be broken down into days or hours as required.
        • Only time spent away from work would be considered leave time.
      • Eligibility: an employee who is a victim of interpersonal or sexual violence or an employee who is a parent of a child who is a victim or an employee who is a caregiver of a victim of interpersonal or sexual violence and the employee requires time off work to:
        • seek medical attention for a victim with respect to a physical or psychological injury or disability caused by interpersonal or sexual violence;
        • obtain services from a victim services organization;
        • obtain psychological or other professional counselling;
        • relocate temporarily or permanently; or
        • seek legal or law enforcement assistance, including preparing for or participating in any civil or criminal legal proceeding related to or resulting from the interpersonal or sexual violence.
      • Employees must have worked for an employer for a minimum of 13 weeks and will be required to provide evidence of the services being received if the employer requests it. This could be written confirmation from:
        • a social worker;
        • a member of the College of Psychologists;
        • a duly qualified medical practitioner;
        • a practicing member of the Saskatchewan Registered Nurses Association or the Registered Psychiatric Nurses Association of Saskatchewan;
        • a member of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police or another police service; or
        • another person approved by the employer who is employed by an agency or organization that provides emergency or transitional shelter or support for victims of interpersonal violence.
      • Employers are required to ensure personal information about employees accessing the leave is kept confidential.
    • Can I end a lease early for safety?

      Tenants who are affected by interpersonal violence may be able to end a lease early if the continuation of the tenancy could pose a safety risk. Victims must obtain a certificate from Victim Services which then allows them to end a fixed term tenancy by giving 28 days’ notice to the landlord. Contact Victim Services toll free at 1-888-286-6664 for more information.

  • How do I know
    if I am being abused?

    • How do I know if I am being abused?

      Below are some warning signs that you may be in a controlling or abusive relationship.
      If your partner does any of the following, consider talking to someone who can help.

      • Ignores or minimizes your feelings
      • Criticizes, insults, or calls you names
      • Makes jokes at your expense, or humiliates you in private or in front of others
      • Refuses to help you when you are sick or injured
      • Uses physical force (push, slap, choke/strangle, shake, use objects/weapons, etc.)
      • Physically harms others (children, pets, family members, friends, neighbours, etc.)
      • Threatens to use physical force (threats aren’t always spoken – they can be silent too, such as looks, gestures, displaying weapons, etc.)
      • Threatens to kill you or others if you leave
      • Threatens to kill themselves if you leave
      • Threatens to: hurt you, take your children, harm your family, or hurt you with a weapon
      • Threatens to turn you into the authorities (police, immigration, etc.) if you leave
      • Blames you for their abusive behaviour, and tells you it was your fault
      • Constantly questions your spending or taken control of your money
      • If you are financially dependent on them, they unreasonably limit the money they give you or refuse to tell you about your family’s financial situation
      • Steals your money
      • Locks you out of your home
      • Refuses to let you leave the house
      • Hides your keys or purse so you can’t leave the house
      • Isolates you from your family, friends, work, and community support
      • Refuses to let you phone your friends or family
      • Tells you who you can and can’t talk to
      • Controls where you go and what you do
      • Tells you what to wear, or harshly criticizes how you dress
      • Constantly demands to know where you are, what you are doing, and who you are with
      • Monitors your phone calls, text messages, emails, Facebook, etc.
      • Checks up on you constantly
      • Shows up unexpectedly (when they were not invited and not welcome) to social or work events
      • Plays mind games
      • Insists you have sex when you don’t want to, or insists you take part in sexual activities you dislike or that cause pain
      • Refuses to let you work, or forces you to work
      • Follows you in a way that makes you fearful
      • Uses your religious or spiritual beliefs to manipulate or control you, or to justify violence against women
      • Denies you freedom of religion by refusing to let you practice your spiritual beliefs or insisting that you follow theirs
      • Destroys your possessions
      • Insists you use drugs or alcohol against your will
      • Insists you take part in dangerous or criminal activities

      To talk to someone right now, call one of the 24-hour support lines below:

      • West Central Crisis and Family Support Centre – Victim Assistance & Support Team (Central Saskatchewan)

      • Lloydminster Interval Home – Domestic Violence/Abuse Crisis Line

      • Northeast Crisis Line (North Saskatchewan)

      • Piwapan Women’s Centre – Crisis Line (North Saskatchewan)

      • Regina Transition House – Domestic Violence/Abuse Crisis Line

      • Saskatoon Interval House – Women’s Abuse Crisis Line (Saskatchewan)

      • Shelwin House – Domestic Violence Crisis Line (Yorkton)

      • Moose Jaw Transition House – Domestic Violence Crisis Line (South Saskatchewan)

      • Southwest Crisis Services – Safe Shelter

      211 Saskatchewan
      For help in finding the right programs or services, call 2-1-1, text 2-1-1, or start an online chat to speak with a caring Service Navigator.

      • The 211 SK service is free, confidential, and available 24/7/365.
      • Over the phone, 211 SK is available in 175+ languages.
      You can use the search tool below to find support services in your area.
      211 program search select one/some/all

      Enter your location to get a better result (required)

      Victims of abuse and crime have special protections to help address the matter, explore their legal remedies, and connect with available support. There are additional considerations and safeguards for victims of sexual violence. Click here for information.

    • Types of Abuse

      Intimate partner violence, also known as domestic violence, can include physical, psychological, emotional, verbal, financial, sexual, and spiritual abuse; excessive jealousy and control; harassment after separation; and murder. Anyone can be a victim of abuse, regardless of ethnic background, age, gender, sexual orientation, disabilities, religion, marital, financial or employment status. Visit PATHS (Provincial Association of Transition Houses and Services of Saskatchewan) for further information.

    • Can I look up information on someone’s violent or abusive past?

      The Interpersonal Violence Disclosure Protocol (Clare’s Law) Act authorizes a police protocol to disclose risk information related to someone’s violent or abusive past to intimate partners whose safety may be threatened.

      • Information can be disclosed to applicants who believe they may be at risk from an intimate partner (“right to ask”), and to persons identified by police to be at risk (“right to know”).
      • To make a request under Clare’s Law, contact your local Police service to start the process.

    • Stalking and the crime of criminal harassment

      Some stalking behaviour is against the law and is known as “criminal harassment” in the Criminal Code of Canada. You can learn more about stalking and the crime of criminal harassment, keeping a stalking log, reducing the risk of harm when being stalked, and reporting harassment to the police, by reading the Stalking Information Sheet.

      Keeping a stalking log is an important way to keep track of unwanted attention and conduct to establish a pattern of harassment. The police may use your stalking log as evidence in a criminal harassment investigation. You may wish to use this example of a stalking log.

    • What is the non-verbal signal for help?

      Signal for Help is a simple one-handed sign someone can use on a video call. It can help a person silently show they need help and want someone to check in with them in a safe way. Click here for further information from the Canadian Women’s Foundation. *NOTE: this signal may not be widely recognized – if you use it, practice caution and have other options for seeking help in case it is not recognized.*

  • I know
    someone being abused

    • When should I call 911?
      • If you witness domestic violence happening—for example, hearing violence in the apartment next to you or seeing a weapon being used to threaten someone—call 911 immediately.
    • Types of Abuse

      Intimate partner violence, also known as domestic violence, can include physical, psychological, emotional, verbal, financial, sexual, and spiritual abuse; excessive jealousy and control; harassment after separation; and murder. Anyone can be a victim of abuse, regardless of ethnic background, age, gender, sexual orientation, disabilities, religion, marital, financial or employment status. Visit PATHS (Provincial Assocation of Transition Houses and Services of Saskatchewan) for further information.

    • What should I do if I think someone I know is experiencing abuse?

      Below are a few ways you can help someone that is being abused, or you suspect is being abused:

      • Listen to their story and believe them.
      • Ask questions like:
        • Do you feel safe?
        • Can I help you find a safe place to stay?
        • Is there anything you need to tell me in confidence?
      • Encourage your friend to think about safety and help build an escape plan.
      • Reach out to domestic violence programs and shelters.
      • Refrain from using discriminating words or phrases that reinforce harmful stereotypes about women and girls.
      • Encourage healthy conversations about women and girls in your peer groups or family gatherings.
      • Consider attending or hosting an interpersonal violence awareness training session for organizations you are involved with.
    • Can I look up information on someone’s violent or abusive past?

      The Interpersonal Violence Disclosure Protocol (Clare’s Law) Act authorizes a police protocol to disclose risk information related to someone’s violent or abusive past to intimate partners whose safety may be threatened.

      • Information can be disclosed to applicants who believe they may be at risk from an intimate partner (“right to ask”), and to persons identified by police to be at risk (“right to know”).
      • To make a request under Clare’s Law, contact your local Police service to start the process.
    • What is the non-verbal signal for help?

      Signal for Help is a simple one-handed sign someone can use on a video call. It can help a person silently show they need help and want someone to check in with them in a safe way. Click here for further information from the Canadian Women’s Foundation. *NOTE: this signal may not be widely recognized at this point – if you use it, practice caution and have other options for seeking help in case it is not recognized.*

  • Violence
    Prevention, Healthy Relationships

    • Violence Prevention / Healthy Relationships

      Children Exposed to Violence

      • Saskatchewan has programs to assist children and youth who have been exposed to interpersonal violence or abuse, with a goal of preventing them from becoming victims or perpetrators of violence and abuse in the future. Visit the Government of Saskatchewan website for a list of programs throughout the province.
      • Young children are especially vulnerable during incidences of intimate partner violence because they are small, unable to protect themselves, and likely to be home when conflict is occurring. Visit Saskatchewan Prevention Institute for related information and resources.
      • Child Abuse and Domestic Violence: all children are at risk of abuse – visit the Saskatchewan Prevention Institute website for related information and resources.
      • Child Abuse and Neglect: Child protection services are available from the Saskatchewan Ministry of Social Services for children who are believed to be in need of protection.
        • It is the goal of the Saskatchewan Ministry of Social Services to keep children in their family home whenever possible and, if a child must be removed for their protection, to reunite families as soon as possible.
        • For children and families living on-reserve, child protection services are provided by First Nations Child and Family Services Agencies.

      Visit the Government of Saskatchewan website for related information, including: stopping child abuse and neglect; reporting abuse, neglect, and violence; and more.

      Family Preservation Programs

      • A number of programs aimed at safely keeping the family together are available. For help in finding programs or services for you, call 2-1-1, text 2-1-1, or start an online chat to speak with a caring Service Navigator, or search on the 211 Saskatchewan website.

      Treatment Programs for Men who Abuse Their Partners

      • Visit the Public Health Agency of Canada’s website or a list of treatment programs for men who abuse their partners in Saskatchewan, including anger management groups, healing circles, alternatives to violence programs, and more.
  • Seniors experiencing abuse or violence

    • Seniors

      The spectrum of elder abuse can be very broad and may include: physical, social, psychological, sexual, emotional, financial, material, legal or regulatory abuse. Abuse may also include omissions or neglect, whether deliberate or unintentional, by oneself or others. Visit the Saskatchewan Seniors Mechanism website to view the Lay Person’s Protocol Regarding Elder Abuse Manual for further information.

      Use the search tool below to find support services near you
      Enter your location to get a better result (required)
  • 2SLGBTQIA+ individuals experiencing abuse or violence

    • 2SLGBTQIA+ Community

      It can be challenging for Two Spirit, lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, and queer folx to access spaces and supports that affirm our identities and experiences. Visit the OutSaskatoon Gender Based Violence Project to learn about gender based violence, its impact on 2SLGBTQIA+ people, and how to support 2SLGBTQIA+ survivors of gender based violence.

      You may use the search tool below to find support services that serve the 2SLGBTQIA+ Community, including gender/sexually diverse individuals:
      Enter your location to get a better result (required)
  • Men experiencing abuse or violence

    • Men

      (an article via HelpGuide, an independent non-profit that runs a mental health website):

      “If you’re a man in an abusive relationship, it’s important to know that you’re not alone. Abuse of men happens far more often than you might expect—in both heterosexual and same sex relationships. It happens to men from all cultures and all walks of life, regardless of age or occupation. Figures suggest that as many as one in three victims of domestic violence are male. However, men are often reluctant to report abuse because they feel embarrassed, fear they won’t be believed, or are scared that their partner will take revenge.”

      View the entire article for further information including protecting yourself and moving on.

      Services for Abused Men

      Many 24-hour support lines are available for men and women in Saskatchewan – click here for information.

      You may also use the search tool below to find support services that serve men:
      Enter your location to get a better result (required)

      The Public Health Agency of Canada suggests contacting your local:

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To search for mental health, income support, food, and other services, visit the 211 Saskatchewan homepage